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Books about Raising Boys

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Book about raising boys

Oct 2009

Any good recommendations for books about raising boys? My sister has 2 boys, and is having a hard time understanding ''boy'' nature, as we grew up in a girls-only family. I looked in Amazon, but the list is huge. Has anyone come across a book that you really liked, with good insights on boy psychology and practical advice? Thanks! Boy's auntie


That wasn't really enough information to give a proper recommendation--how old are the kids and what is the age difference and what are the conflict points so far. Can your sister not handle the rough housing or is it that one boy bullies the other, etc.,etc. Are there school issues? Is she a single mom? Does she feel the boys need role models?

Anyway this is what I've found useful: 'Raising Cain' and 'Real Boys' and for the sibling issues--'Siblings without Rivalry'.

The general ideas are that there is a boy code; there are gender straight jackets; schools tend not to address the emotional life of boys. Good luck dad to boys


A classic boy book is: Raising Cain: Protecting the Emotional Life of Boys. I would highly recommend it.
I found the book ''The Trouble with Boys: A Surprising Report Card on Our Sons, Their Problems at School, and What Parents and Educators Must Do'' by Peg Tyre an eye-opening read. Mother of 2 boys
As the mom of 3 boys I found the book ''Bringing up Boys'' to be invaluable. It really helped me understand the role of testosterone in boys. It helped me to appreciate and embrace their energy. It has some decidedly Christian undertones and I skipped a few parts that were overly preachy for my tastes. But overall I am glad I read the book. even the cat is male
Raising Cain: Protecting the Emotional Life of Boys by Dan Kindlon and Michael Thompson. It's great! Andi
While not specifically just for boys, the series of books by Louise Bates Ames has really, really helped me. There's one for each year, ''Your One-Year-Old,'' ''Your Two-Year-Old,'' etc. http://www.amazon.com/Louise-Bates-Ames/e/B001ITTGLQ/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_pop_1

I check them out of the library each year about 3 months or so before the kids' birthdays. She does address more typical boy versus girl behaviors and one really good thing about her books is she recognizes that there are a range of temperaments. (I just attended a talk by a some family therapists and when asked about some particular parenting technique books, their issue was that often these books only really work with certain temperaments or developmental phases.) They are a quick read, well written and give you a good understanding of each developmental phase and what certain behaviors that we might not understand are about . Some of their examples may be a bit dated and not totally PC, but I have found year after year they have really hit the mark on what my children are going through. mama of an boyish boy


I'd like to do some reading on male child development

August 2005

Hi! I'm looking for some resources about parenting a boy. I'm really starting to notice some differences between my 14 month- old son and other children his age (particularly girls). I'd like to do some reading on male child development. Any suggestions? Thanks! Viki


I think Raising Cain is an excellent choice. I came from 3 girls and did not have quite the understanding of boys energy vs. girls. This provided me with insight. mommy
My husband loves the book ''Raising Boys'' by Steve Biddulph.
(from Amazon.com: From Publishers Weekly Australian family therapist Biddulph (Manhood) joins the chorus of counselors calling for a focused, supportive approach to parenting boys. Citing such gender specific risks facing boys as a higher percentage of learning disabilities to greater threats of violence and suicide, Biddulph maps out parenting strategies for three distinct stages of growth, from birth to six years, from six to 14, and from 14 to adult. Choosing not to mince words, he advises fathers, for instance, ''if you routinely work a fifty-five or sixty-hour week, including travel time, you just won't cut it as a dad.'' Citing studies that show boys are ''more prone than girls to separation anxiety,'' he suggests keeping boys out of child care if possible before the age of three. He recommends delaying school entrance by a year to give boys time to develop fine motor skills, and calls sports a ''double-edged sword'' which, while enormously beneficial, can also encourage negative traits if sportsmanship is eclipsed by an obsession with winning. Biddulph delves into physiological matters, examining and explaining the role testosterone plays in shaping male children, and talking frankly about sexuality. Enhanced by plentiful sidebars, photos and cartoons, the material is presented in digestible chunks, and each chapter wraps up with a summary section, ''In a Nutshell.'' This highly practical guide offers valuable perspectives to parents of both boys and girls. Copyright 1998 Cahners Business Information, Inc.)
Kat
I have 2 sons, age 16 and 19. The two books which were eye openers for me were: Raising Cain, by Kindlon & Thompson 2 psychologists who have worked extensively with adolescent boys. They really helped me understand why school and my younger son were like oil and water. And Why Gender Matters by Leonard Sax. Sax's book goes over more recent cognitive science and neurological info about the hard wire differences between boys and girls. This was really helpful. As a mom of boys, I have said a million times, ''Why do I have to yell in order for you to pay attention'' In fact, when my younger son was 3 I had his hearing tested. Hearing tests perfect! but I still have to yell. Sax explains why. So it takes the judgment out of the situation. Boys like higher volume.... rock and roll, the decibel level of computer games, etc. Read Sax' book, it won't tell you how to parent, but it will allow you to stop applying inappropriate social rules and let your son be a boy. I'm getting along much better with my son.
_Raising Cain, Protecting The Emotional Life of Boys_, by Dan Kindlon and Michale Thompson. _The Scientist in the Crib_ (can't recall the author) was also interesting and pointed out some differences betweein boys and girls and are two books I enjoyed. mom to a boy
As a Early Childhood Education major and former preschool teacher and mommy to a 6 year old little boy, I have some very good recommendations for you. The following two books were excellent and I learned a lot about boys from them: The Wonder of Boys by Michael Gurian and Raising Cain by Dan Kindlon & Michael Thompson. Others may come to mind too, but these ones are my favorites! Feel free to email me with any questions! Jessica
I highly recommend reading Steve Biddulph on raising boys. He specialises in this field and his approach is characterised by common sense rather than psychobabble. Details of his book can be fhound at http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0890878536/qid=1125030986/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/103-7830536-3560610?v=glance&s=books Tracey
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