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Boys' Facial & Body Hair

Advice, discussions, and reviews from the Parents of Teens weekly email newsletter.

Berkeley Parents Network > Advice > Teens, Preteens, & Young Adults > Boys' Facial & Body Hair


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13-year-old son's eyebrows

Feb 2012

My 13 year old son has some hair between his eyebrows (not quite a uni-brow). His complexion is brown. He probably could care less at this time, but I'm still wondering if we should consider some method of hair removal. Anyone ever done this? Does the hair grow back? Thanks anon


I don't understand why you would need to remove your son's hair. It's his face; if it doesn't bother him, why bring it up and make him self-conscious about it? There's nothing wrong with having some hair between the eyebrows. leave the kid alone
I am an esthetician and have seen quite a few teen boys with uni-brows. I wax between the brows and it is quick and relatively painless. All the boys have been happy with the look. It really opens up their eyes. Also, the hair grows back much finer, thinner and eventually there is less and less. Feel free to contact me with any questions. 925.283.7546 Skinsense 925 Village Center Lafayette. Marika
If your son is not bothered by the hair between his eyebrows, why make him self conscious about it? I wouldn't mention it at all, until he mentions it to you as a problem.

My son did get teased for the hair between his eyebrows, some kids called him ''unibrow''. I hardly responded as I didn't want to make a big deal of it, but mentioned that sometimes I pluck my eyebrows. He started to pluck a few hairs for awhile, and eventually the teasing stopped and he's back to letting the hairs naturally grow in.

We are all too ''looks'' focused. mom of two teens


Teenage son's abundant body hair

August 2006

My son has had a lot of hair on his legs since about 3rd grade, or at least that's when other kids noticed and he became self- conscious about it. Now he's a teenager (16) and is just miserable about his abundant hair to the point where he won't go to the pool with us or wear short pants.

I have to admit, he has a lot of hair. His father and I are not particularly hairy, nor is anyone in our families. I have two questions. 1. Is there any kind of disorder that could cause excessive hair growth? (he also gets hot flashes). 2. What can a young man do about excessive hair. I don't think he'd want to get rid of all of it.

And while I'm asking...has anyone else's teenage boy complained of getting hot flashes? I mentioned it to the doctor and she dismissed it with a wave of the hand.. anon


You may want to get your son's hormones evaluated. If his ped is unwilling to do that, you can find a naturopath, osteopath, OMD or chiropractor to do a salivary test. The hot flashes he is experiencing seem unusual in my experience as a nutrition professional. Nori H.
I'm sorry, I don't really any answer to your second question, but yes, there is a disorder which can cause children to (and adults) to grow excess body hair. Perhaps ask your son's doctor about it, if you haven't already. Best, Amy
I have two very hairy brothers. Starting in high school, they began using clippers (like the kind barbers use to cut hair) to trim the hairs on their arms, legs, back, chest, and stomach. I believe that they used the clippers with the number one clip. After clipping, they look much less hairy, and a lot neater. It seems less drastic than shaving, and they were pleased with the results. From what I could see, they didn't look unnatural or anything, although I would try a small, unnoticable patch first just in case he doesn't like the way it looks. Sarah
Hi! Sorry that this is so late, but I had to share this with you. If he only has lots of hair on his legs, tell him to feel extremely lucky! That is an easy one to control. Shaving is not good- it creates stubble and makes the hairs grow back thicker and darker. Waxing is messy at home, or expensive and probably embarrassing to him in a salon, and depilators (sp?) cause the same problems as shaving. What I have found to be so awesome to control unwanted hairs is an electric tweezer gadget made by Emjoi. Check out the website www.emjoi.com and look for the hair removers box to click on. They make some that are expensive and portable and cordless but all you really need is the Gently Gold Caress with the cord for about $60. I have had mine for 12 years, and its still going strong. It consists of 30 or so quickly rotating tweezers that pull the hair out by the roots the same as if you had waxed. He will probably want to trim the hair a bit shorter with clippers before he uses it the first time. And let him know that it is going to be kinda painful, but less so than getting a tattoo (if that helps!) Then, it will take maybe 20-30 min per leg to do the first time, and he might have to stop and clean the tweezers out from time to time, and he will wnat to do it over a sink or tub or cloth to catch the hairs. But when he is done, besides having an irritated leg for about 12 hours, he will have soft, smooth, hairless skin for 3-6 weeks. He also would not have to do every hair, but could just lighten up the hairs that are there. The thing that I love about this method is that over the years my underarm and leg and bikini line hairs have gotten fewer and lighter and I only have to use the tweezer thing 1x maybe 2x a month and it is very quick and not painful since the hairs are not all coming out at once. Good luck, and also, after he gets older the leg hairs may become more endearing than annoying No razors no wax no hairs
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